Cork Tramways Company

Summary
Despite existing as a working entity for barely two years - and possibly even less than that, given that the precise date that working ceased is now unclear - several excellent photographs have survived. These clearly show that drivers and conductors wore smart but informal attire, comprising heavy-duty jackets, trousers, shirt and tie, and tall hats, the latter almost certainly being the favoured local fashion of the day. There is no evidence to suggest that badges or licences of any kind were worn.

Given the smallness of the system, just 2.5 miles, and the fact that it was severely handicapped by poor relations with the municipal authorities, on whom it depended for extensions which would have made the concern viable, it seems highly probably that inspectors were never employed.

For a history of Cork's horse tramway, see: 'Tram Tracks Through Cork' by Walter McGrath; Tower Books (1981).

Images

Horse tram drivers and conductors
Cork Tramways Company Trams No 5 and 6 at Grand Parade 1872
Horse cars No 5 (foreground) and No 6 (left background) pictured at the Berwick Fountain loop, Grand Parade in 1872, the year the concern opened. Photo courtesy of the Tramways and Light Railway Society, with thanks to David Voice.


Cork Tramways Company Trams Tram No 5 conductor and driver
A blow-up of the above photo showing the driver (right) and conductor (on the rear platform), both of whom are wearing informal attire.


Cork Tramways Company Tram No 6 1872
A pristine-looking No 6, seemingly without a conductor, waits on the Victoria Quay in 1872. Photo courtesy of the Tramways and Light Railway Society, with thanks to David Voice.


Cork - 1 CROP
A blow-up of the above photo showing the driver, who appears to be wearing informal attire and a tall hat.