St Helens and District Tramways

Summary
Photographs of St Helens and District Tramways Company horse trams are rare, but the single example below would seem to indicate that like most horse tram operators, the StH&DTCo was happy for its staff to wear informal attire, namely: heavy jackets and trousers, and the fashionable headgear of the day, the ubiquitous bowler hat. No insignia of any kind - either badges or licences - appears to have been carried; however, given the paucity of photographic evidence, a note of caution must be exercised.

Following the introduction of steam tram services by the St Helens and District Tramways Company Ltd - which was expressly formed to take over the StH&DTCo for that purpose - conductors continued to wear informal but smart attire, comprising: jacket, trousers, shirt and tie, and the usual bowler hat, though the latter appears to have been displaced in later years by the flat cap. Drivers wore very similar attire to their railway counterparts, namely: heavy cotton trousers and jackets, predominantly light in colour. No badges of any kind appear to have been worn, though the last photo below does show a conductor wearing what is almost certainly a round, municipal licence - these were probably introduced following the corporation take-over of 1st April 1897, the company thereafter becoming a lessee.

Images

Horse tram drivers and conductors
St Helens and District horse tram
Driver and conductor pose for the camera with Horsecar No 1 in Ormskirk Street - photo undated, but almost certainly taken in the 1880s given that steam traction was introduced on this route on 3rd April 1890. Photo courtesy of the Tramways and Light Railway Society, with thanks to David Voice.


Steam tram drivers and conductors
St Helens Steam Tram No 9 1891
Steam Tram No 9 - photo purportedly taken in November 1891 when the engine was delivered. Author's collection.


St Helens Steam Tram driver
Blow-up of the above photo showing the driver, in cotton jacket and unmarked cap. He is carrying an oil can in his right hand.


St Helens Steam Tram conductor
Another blow-up of the above photo, this time showing the conductor, who is wearing informal attire and a flat cap. The bowler-hatted figure is probably the manager or workshop foreman.


St Helens Steam Tram No 8
Steam Tram No 8 and Trailer No 6 on a Pleasley Cross to Dentons Green service - photo undated, but probably taken in the mid 1890s. The full company title on the rocker panel had by this time been replaced by advertisements, with the previously plain waist panel now carrying the company device in a garter.


St Helens Steam Tram Driver
A blow-up of the above photo showing the driver, once again with oil can in hand.


St Helens Steam Tram conductor
Another blow-up of the above photo, this time showing the conductor (on the left).


St Helens stam tram
Another shot of Steam Tram No 9, with Trailer No 3, on a St Helens to Prescott service - photo undated, but probably taken in the mid 1890s. The conductor is wearing informal attire and a bowler hat. Photo courtesy of the Tramways and Light Railway Society, with thanks to David Voice.


St Helens steam tram
Driver and conductor pose for the camera with an unidentified steam tram and Trailer No 8, on a St Helens to Haydock service - photo undated, but given the rather tatty condition of the tram, probably after the corporation take-over (of the tracks) of 1897. This would also explain why the conductor is wearing a licence, as these were presumably introduced following the take-over. Photo courtesy of the Tramways and Light Railway Society, with thanks to David Voice.